When it comes to nonfiction that meets a need, I have two responses for books that immediately solve a problem: “I wish I would I have had this when …” and “Why didn’t I think of that?”

The Self Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide made me respond in both ways.

I wish I would have had this resource when I first began self-publishing in 2013. With more than 850 curated and verified resources in 32 categories, the guide that Joel Friedlander and Betty Kelly Sargent compiled offers a directory of self-publishing that should prove invaluable to any new (and old) self-publishing author.

When I first considered self-publishing, I knew few people who had done so before, and I had no idea who to turn to for editing, formatting, cover design, etc. I eventually found good and qualified people to work with, but had I had the Resource Guide, I likely would have saved at least a weeks’ worth of time instead of trying to research so many self-publishing options.

Furthermore, I was surprised at the Resource Guide’s breadth. When I first heard about the book, I assumed it would be a compendium of editors, formatters, and cover designers, the triumvirate of professionals that nearly every self-publisher needs. I was glad to see that the book went beyond those necessities and included information on others areas like illustrators, book production software, and promotional help.

The Self Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide divides its massive amount of information into Prepare, Publish, and Promote sections, and considering how much work a self-publisher must do in each of these areas, it’s a smart division that helps writers think through their books’ actual needs.

Why didn’t I think of this book? Because I certainly don’t have the connections or the experience that Friedlander (TheBookDesigner.com) and Sargent have.

As two publishing and self-publishing professionals for many years, they know hundreds (if not thousands) of publishing professionals. If there were two people to be trusted to curate such a list of self-publishing professionals, it’s them (and I base this off of their credentials—I don’t know either one). Learn more about why they compiled the book in this interview by Joanna Penn with Joel Friedlander.

Lastly, I was pleased to read that the Resource Guide will be a living document, one that’s updated yearly with new entries. In time, the book may become unwieldy as I believe self-publishing will continue to rise as a viable means for authors to see their words in print. But it’s still a worthwhile investment. And, for what it’s worth, I’ve pitched myself to be included in the next edition.

As a practical resource that meets a deep need, I recommend The Self Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide for all self-publishing authors.

If you’ve self-published, how did you find other publishing professionals to work with?

This honest review was written in exchange for a free review copy of The Self Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide.

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